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Do It Yourself Fillers

 
 
 

Do it yourself fillers are not recommended!A filler is a natural or synthetic material that can be injected to improve the appearance, usually of wrinkles or lips. Fillers can be temporary or permanent, and a number of different fillers are currently used for cosmetic purposes.

More information can be found on our fillers info page.

 

 

What is a do it yourself filler?

These are fillers that you can buy yourself, for injection by yourself or a friend. At present, the internet appears to be the main source of do-it-yourself fillers.

 

Are do it yourself fillers safe?

No. Whilst some fillers being sold to the public may be the genuine article, many are sent to people pre-loaded in a syringe without any labelling or indication of the content nature. You therefore do not know what you are injecting into yourself!

Also, injecting a filler is generally a difficult procedure to perform. Even in expert hands there are risks (see our fillers page for risks), and in unexperienced hands the consequences can be disasterous. The effects of misplaced filler can include skin death, infection, lumps forming under the skin, blindness and even death.

The use of do it yourself fillers has been widely condemned by the medical community, and for very good reasons.

 

But I have heard of people using do it yourself fillers without problems?

This is either marketing hype, or a few very lucky people that have avoided serious complications. Do not take the risk!

 

 

Other SurgeryWise articles

You may also be interested to read our articles on Fillers, Botox, face lifts, blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) or other Cosmetic surgery articles

 

 

Any procedure involving skin incision can also result in unfavourable scarring, wound infection, or bleeding. This list of risks is not exhaustive, and you should discuss possible complications with your specialist. Whilst these risks will seem very worrysome, and indeed can be serious, it should also be borne in mind that many people have no postoperative problems whatsoever.

The information provided is as a guide only and you should discuss matters fully with your specialist before deciding if this is the right procedure for you. Please also read our disclaimer

 

 

 

   
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